Frequently asked questions

What is the difference between the yellow and the orange planes?

ADS-B and MLAT data that is processed in real time is shown with yellow aircraft symbols. FAA data that is processed with a 5 minute delay is shown with orange aircraft symbols. Please read How it works for information about how Flightradar24 works.

I was following an aircraft when it suddenly disappeared, why?

In most cases the reason is that the coverage from the surrounding receivers has been lost. It can also be a technical problem somewhere. Coverage at the same spot can be different depending on data source and aircraft type. Please read How it works for information about how Flightradar24 works, coverage and aircraft visibility.

Can you help me find flight xxYYY?

When watching the live map there is search field just below the Flightradar24 logo. Please use it to search for a flight number or callsign of the flight you are looking for. There could be several reasons why a flight can't be found. Either it has not taken off yet or already landed. Also not all aircraft are equipped with a correct transponder to be able to be tracked by Flightradar24, or the flight could be flying out of coverage for our 4,000 receivers. Please read How it works for information about how Flightradar24 works.

Flightradar24 and our support can't help searching for individual flights or aircraft.

Do you know why flight xxYYY is or was delayed?

Flightradar24 in some cases receive advance delay information for some flights. But we don't have any information about reason for the delay. For all questions about delays please contact the airline or airport directly. Please read How it works for information about how Flightradar24 works.

Flightradar24 and our support can't issue flight delay certificates.

Is it possible to see history of flights on Flightradar24.com?

Yes, press 'Playback' in sidebar to view global flight history from the last 7 days (free version). You can also find history about individual flights and aircraft from the last 7 days (free version) in our aviation database.

Premium users can access up to 30 days of playback and flight history.

Flightradar24 and our support can't help searching for historical flights.

What is the difference between a callsign and a flight number?

There are 2 big aviation organizations - ICAO and IATA. ICAO handles aviation in general including navigation and technical issues. IATA is handling the commercial side of aviation including flight tickets. That means that in most cases a passenger airline ticket is sold with IATA standards/rules, for example DL-flight number from LHR to JFK, but the pilot is flying the aircraft with ICAO standards/rules, which means he is flying with DAL-callsign from EGLL to KJFK. Most airlines have both a 3-letter ICAO-code (used for callsign) and 2-letter IATA-code (used for flight number). Charter airlines and business jet operators in most cases only have a 3-letter ICAO-code (used for callsign), as they are not selling any flight tickets so they don't need a flight number. Small/Private aircraft in most cases don't have an airline code and use their registration as callsign. Most airports in the world have a 4-letter ICAO-code but only airports handling passenger traffic have a 3-letter IATA-code.

What are the blue points on the map?

The blue points marks airports with regular and daily scheduled passenger traffic in areas where Flightradar24 normally have coverage. You can click on an airport marker to get an arrival or departure board for that airport. The airport markers can be removed in settings.

Why is airport XXX not marked with a blue point?

There are many thousands of airports around the world. Showing all airports would make the map almost completely covered with points everywhere. The primary feature of the blue point is the possibility to click and show the arrival & departure. In order to keep the map clean we only plot airports with regular and daily scheduled passenger traffic where an arrival or departure board will show arriving or departing flights.

Why is there a flight missing on the departure & arrival board?

Flightradar24 combines data from several data sources including schedule and flight status databases from airlines and airports around the world. These databases includes most regular and scheduled flights but some minor airlines and charter airlines may be missing. Flightradar24 is working continuously to acquire as much route data as possible.

Why is the route information not correct?

The route is not transmitted from the aircraft. Flightradar24 is using the callsign of the flight and compare it with big databases of airline and airport schedules to find the matching flight number. With the flight number we can find out and show the route of the flight. There are many reasons why a route can be incorrect for example changed flight plans for some reason, wrong or old callsign typed in to the transponder, error in some of the schedule databases, long delay of flight which makes the schedule data match against wrong flight or some other matching problem.

Why don't you show routes for all flights?

The flight route is not transmitted from the aircraft. Flightradar24 is using the callsign of the flight and compare it with big databases of airline and airport schedules to find the matching flight number. Not all airlines are submitting their schedules or we have failed to make a match for some reason, for example due to incorrect callsign or delayed flight. Many delivery, position and charter flights are missing route as this data is often missing in the databases that Flightradar24 use. Flightradar24 is working continuously to acquire as much route data as possible.

Why did it look like the aircraft landed outside the runway? Has it crashed?

The ADS-B transponder on board the aircraft is transmitting the position from the on board flight computer, which in most modern aircraft comes from GPS data and is very accurate. On some older aircraft (for example some older A300, B737, B757, B767 and RJ100) the position is calibrated on ground before take off and after that the current position is calculated based on speed and direction of the aircraft. When flying for some time, in wind or in circles the calculation becomes worse and worse, which at landing can give position calculations that are up to 10 km incorrect.